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Punch heard ’round the NCAA

Today’s headlines may read “Boise State beats Oregon,” for the ugly display of what football isn’t supposed to look like among those with BCS implications. It was perhaps the most horrifically played game I’ve watched in years, with the sheer number of dumb penalties and the third and fourth quarter turnover race, this game ranked up there in sheer inconsistency and ugliness.

Sadly enough, the game could have either been a blowout by Boise State if they capitalized on their laundry list of mistakes, or it could have been Oregon singing songs of joy at destroying the BCS hopes of Boise State in the first week of play.

Instead, both teams looked terrible and suddenly the rest of Boise State’s first-thought cupcake schedule looks a bit more interesting, especially if the team finds itself coughing up the ball in crucial situations repeatedly. Oregon gave the brand new Pac-10 commissioner a headache to deal with on his first week in his new job, and did nothing to help the Pac-10’s image of being “the league USC plays in.”


The game was a flop and pretty boring to watch. LeGarrette Blount was quoted as saying that Oregon owed an ass whooping to Boise State for the upset they pulled last year, only to have that turn into a sucker punch in tact. Not that it mattered a whole lot after the game, when Blount did deliver an ass whooping, only to Boise State lineman Byron Hout, who was tapped jawing at Blount after the game (probably about the pregame quote) only to receive the retaliatory haymaker to the jaw and getting knocked senseless in the span of two seconds.

If football falls through, maybe LeGarrette Blount could train for the UFC.

Then the fireballs began to fly, with people screaming murder at a punch and labeling Blount as a thug. In all honesty, even with the punch being a cheap shot, Hout deserved every pound-per-square-inch of force that was thrown behind that. Emotions run high, and to get teammates into the right state of mind to play a violent game, violent things are usually said. The media caused a lot of the problem by simply taking a pregame motivational bit and using it as cannon fodder for the announcers to run with during the game and debate on constantly.

Now the media and college officials are calling for Oregon to suspend or kick LeGarrette Blount off the team.  I think that’s a load of crap.  Yes, he made a bad judgment call, but kicking the kid off the team for retaliating?  If you watch the film, he was angry, but under control as he was leaving the field until Byron Hout grabbed his shoulder pad and taunted him.  In a game with emotions running that high, Hout was asking for trouble, and he got it in spades (and looked like a damn fool to millions of people watching the replay).

If Blount sought someone out to fight after the game, then I would agree that he deserves the stiffest of punishments, but when someone steps on your toes, you push back.  I can respect Blount for not letting someone walk over him, but it would have been better if he chose a different way in which to do it.

Should Blount be suspended? Probably.  Removed from the team? No.  Players are put under incredible pressure on the national stage to perform in these testosterone loaded battles in front of thousands.  If Blount is to be suspended, the same should be thrown at Hout, because without Hout’s instigation, this matter would never have happened.

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