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Baby cut from womb found alive

Darlene Haynes was eight months pregnant and happily expecting the birth of her child.  She had gone through some domestic problems with the father of the child, and even filed a restraining order.  She was pushed into a glass table, grabbed her by the throat and slapped.  Things had quieted down after the restraining order was filed, and things appeared to be going well for her.

Until the events unfolded and she never saw the birth of her own child.


Darlene Haynes was murdered, her baby cut from the womb, and was left dead, wrapped in sheets in a closet in her apartment.  The landlord inspected the apartment after finding a horrible smell emanating from within.  The police first went and questioned the boyfriend, and given the domestic violence issues claimed between the two, he seemed the logical person to blame.

That is until friends of another woman who claimed to have given birth recently were suspicious, given the story of how this woman gave birth.  

The woman’s name is Julie Corey and she was arrested, with the baby, in New Hampshire.  The baby was found with a ribbon tied around the umbilical cord, obviously not the way most umbilical cords are cut under hospital supervision.  Julie Corey abducted Haynes’s baby, moved to New Hampshire shortly after, within six days of the falsely claimed birth, and lived in a homeless shelter with the child.

Aside from the obvious gruesome bits of information this story details, the case highlights a problem that isn’t isolated to this case alone.  

Women in the past have been murdered and had their children taken from the womb, but usually they don’t make it.  Women have also had babies abducted by other women, simply because these other women wanted a child.  The lack of common sense and respect for other human being and their rights is drastically overshadowed by the gruesome and horrific details many of these cases.  The issue is what society allows these disturbed people believe: that everyone has the right to have a child.

Parenthood is a privilege, not a right.  Women who are unable to conceive have the option of adopting if a counsel of their peers deem them financially and emotionally competent to care for a child.  No one has the right to take a child from another person for their own private gain.  Taking a child and living on the run in a homeless shelter in another state is not the proper way to care for a child.  

Julie Corey, in this case, is clearly displaying the monstrous side of humanity functioning solely on selfish gain with complete disregard for others.

The story does have a somewhat happy ending with the child being found and taken into custody and the woman who allegedly murdered Darlene Haynes for an infant behind bars. Even if she did not murder Haynes, though it seems highly likely, taking a newborn in the condition it was in and moving to another state to live out of a homeless shelter is a case where government intervention is needed anyway.

Darlene Haynes’s child will be taken care of, and the mother would be happy at that.

1 comment so far

This must be the saddest story about crime against humans that I have ever read. Pregnancy and childbirth are the most fulfilling experience a woman is entitled to and to think that another woman should resort to murder to covet such an experience is indeed sad.

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